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The Monarchy and the Constitution$

Vernon Bogdanor

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198293347

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198293348.001.0001

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(p.316) Appendix 5: Some Constitutional Episodes Involving the Use of Royal Power Since 1900

(p.316) Appendix 5: Some Constitutional Episodes Involving the Use of Royal Power Since 1900

Source:
The Monarchy and the Constitution
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

1909

December. Edward VII refuses to promise to create peers until after a second general election

1910

November. George V agrees to give a secret pledge to create peers, if necessary, to pass the Parliament Bill

1914

George V implies that he might either veto the Home Rule Bill or dismiss his ministers

1916

Buckingham Palace Conference to select new prime minister following the resignation of H. H. Asquith

1922

First local governor‐general, Tim Healy, in the Irish Free State

1924

January. George V asks Ramsay MacDonald to form first minority Labour government

1926

Lord Byng, the governor general of Canada, refuses a dissolution to Mackenzie King. King resigns and is succeeded by Arthur Meighen, the leader of the opposition. Meighen's government is granted a dissolution. Mackenzie King wins the ensuing general election

1926

Balfour formula, by which allegiance to the Crown becomes the constitutional link between the Dominions

1930

First local governor‐general of Australia, Sir Isaac Isaacs

1931

August. George V invites Ramsay MacDonald to form a National Government

1931

Statute of Westminster

1932

First dismissal of a governor‐general when de Valera, prime minister of the Irish Free State, dismisses James McNeill

1936

Abdication

1939

Sir Patrick Duncan, governor‐general of South Africa, after ascertaining that General Smuts would be able to form a government, refuses dissolution to General Hertzog, who had been defeated in parliament, and was in a minority in his cabinet

1949

Declaration of London, by which the king becomes Head of the Commonwealth

1957

Elizabeth II appoints Harold Macmillan as prime minister, rather than R. A. Butler

1963

Elizabeth II appoints Lord Home as prime minister, rather than R. A. Butler, Lord Hailsham, or Reginald Maudling

1975

Sir John Kerr, governor‐general of Australia, dismisses the prime minister, Gough Whitlam, for seeking to govern without supply

1983

Sir Paul Scoon, governor‐general of Grenada, assumes emergency powers

1987

Elizabeth II issues two messages in her capacity as Queen of Fiji, acting without advice

(p.317)