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Imaginative Minds$
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Ilona Roth

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780197264195

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197264195.001.0001

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Music, Science, and Culture

Music, Science, and Culture

Chapter:
(p.147) 7 Music, Science, and Culture
Source:
Imaginative Minds
Author(s):

CROSS IAN

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197264195.003.0007

Music is conceptualized as a product and a process of imagination. It is often assumed that engagement in music initiates the developmental and evolutionary emergence of imagination. This conception of music and its relationship to human powers of imagining is treated differently in science and musicology. For science, music is simply a complex pattern of sound or the experience of structured sound. For musicology and ethnomusicology, music cannot be separated from the cultural contexts in which they are embedded. This chapter proposes a broad operational definition of music which can be acceptable and applicable cross-naturally. This radical redefinition of music may provide ways of understanding music as both a culturally embedded practice and biologically grounded structure. Apart from providing a redefinition of music, the chapter also investigates some of the potential implications and consequences of this radical redefinition of music such as the possibility that the human capacity for culture may have been supported and consolidated by the emergence and presence of musicality.

Keywords:   music, musicology, sound patterns, structured sound, ethnomusicology, cultural contexts, culturally embedded practice, biologically grounded structure, musicality

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