Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Registration and RecognitionDocumenting the Person in World History$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Keith Breckenridge and Simon Szreter

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265314

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265314.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Monitoring the Abolition of the International Slave Trade: Slave Registration in the British Caribbean

Monitoring the Abolition of the International Slave Trade: Slave Registration in the British Caribbean

Chapter:
(p.323) 12 Monitoring the Abolition of the International Slave Trade: Slave Registration in the British Caribbean
Source:
Registration and Recognition
Author(s):

Stanley L. Engerman

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265314.003.0013

This chapter deals with the background and implementation of the registration of slaves on the island of Trinidad after 1813. Registration was introduced by James Stephen in the British Colonial Office as a means of limiting the inflow of slaves in the illegal slave trade. Slave registration was extended to the other British colonies and then extended every three years until the end of slavery in 1834. Other registrations of slaves are noted, including the manifests of the coastal shipping of slaves in the USA after 1808.

Keywords:   slave registration, James Stephen, illegal slave imports, coastal shipping manifests, slaves

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.