Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Registration and RecognitionDocumenting the Person in World History$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Keith Breckenridge and Simon Szreter

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265314

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265314.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Birth Registration and the Promotion of Children’s Rights in the Interwar Years

Birth Registration and the Promotion of Children’s Rights in the Interwar Years

The Save the Children International Union's Conference on the African Child and Herbert Hoover's American Child Health Association

Chapter:
(p.449) 17 Birth Registration and the Promotion of Children’s Rights in the Interwar Years
Source:
Registration and Recognition
Author(s):

Dominique Marshall

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265314.003.0018

The right of children to be registered at birth was not part of early universal declarations of entitlements for the young adopted in the wake of the First World War. But during the interwar years, the main proponents of these declarations — the Save the Children International Union and the American Child Health Association, headed by philanthropist and future President Herbert Hoover — soon understood that the registration of infants was at the basis of their work, especially that concerned with the reduction of infant mortality. This chapter studies their respective campaigns in Africa and in the United States, respectively, to show how registration came to be understood as a prerequisite for the full promises of children's rights to be realized. It draws surprising parallels between the two efforts, related to the size of the territory and the discrimination faced by children due to their race and their ethnic origins.

Keywords:   children's rights, Save the Children, Herbert Hoover, Child Health Association, birth registration, African children

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.