Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Registration and RecognitionDocumenting the Person in World History$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Keith Breckenridge and Simon Szreter

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265314

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265314.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Household Registration, Property Rights, and Social Obligations in Imperial China: Principles and Practices

Household Registration, Property Rights, and Social Obligations in Imperial China: Principles and Practices

Chapter:
(p.39) 1 Household Registration, Property Rights, and Social Obligations in Imperial China: Principles and Practices
Source:
Registration and Recognition
Author(s):

Richard Von Glahn

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265314.003.0002

Civil registration for the purposes of social control and the mobilization of labour has been a cornerstone of the Chinese imperial state since ancient times. This chapter traces the origins and historical development of the civil registration system of imperial China in order to clarify its ideological and institutional evolution, focusing on four key phases: the initial development of household registration for military conscription that accompanied the rise of autocratic states and the founding of the first empires during the first millennium bce; the institution of state landownership during the fifth to eighth centuries ce; the shift from the household to wealth as the basis of taxation and the introduction of household-ranking systems under the Song dynasty; and the rise and demise of the lijia system of rural social organization during the late imperial era (Ming and Qing dynasties).

Keywords:   China, household, taxation, conscription, autocratic state, state landownership, property rights, social control

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.