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Red StrainsMusic and Communism Outside the Communist Bloc$
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Robert Adlington

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265390

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265390.001.0001

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Talking Union

Talking Union

The Folk Revival and the American Left

Chapter:
(p.31) 3 Talking Union
Source:
Red Strains
Author(s):

Ernie Lieberman

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265390.003.0003

Ernie Lieberman grew up in the midst of the folk revival that took place during the Depression, World War II, and the Cold War. This chapter describes how folk music came to be important to the American left, the issues on which they focused (union organizing, racial and gender equality, peace), and Lieberman's own participation in the movement. As a child in the 1930s, he admired Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie, and sang folk and protest songs at summer camp, Progressive party conventions, and on tours for the Civil Rights Congress. In the 1950s, he performed and recorded albums with the first interracial folk group, and later, as political folk music began to reach a wider audience, became a songwriter.

Keywords:   Ernie Lieberman, communism, folk music, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Progressive party, blacklist, civil rights, Cold War, United States

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