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Early FarmersThe View from Archaeology and Science$
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Alasdair Whittle and Penny Bickle

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265758

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265758.001.0001

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Settlement Burials at the Karsdorf LBK Site, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

Settlement Burials at the Karsdorf LBK Site, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

Biological Ties and Residential Mobility

Chapter:
(p.95) 6 Settlement Burials at the Karsdorf LBK Site, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany
Source:
Early Farmers
Author(s):

Guido Brandt

Corina Knipper

Nicole Nicklisch

Robert Ganslmeier

Mechthild Klamm

Kurt W. Alt

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265758.003.0006

The Linearbandkeramik (LBK) settlement of Karsdorf (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany) revealed twenty-four longhouses and thirty-four associated burials. They were investigated in an interdisciplinary study focusing primarily on biological relationships and mobility within the community. Males, females, and subadults were buried individually or in groups in pits accompanying longhouses suggesting family relationships. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), however, revealed only few biological relations among them. The rare potential relatives were found in different houses, indicating very low continuity of maternal lineages. Strontium isotope ratios of human tooth enamel point to differentiated land-use patterns or interaction of the Karsdorf community in the Unstrut river valley with people from settlements in typical loess locations. Representatives of both isotope ranges distinguished occur among all burial groups. The integrated interpretation of all data suggests exchange of people within consolidated networks of LBK neighbouring communities.

Keywords:   Linearbandkeramik, Karsdorf, biological relationships, mitochondrial DNA, strontium isotopes, land-use

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