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Making HistoryEdward Augustus Freeman and Victorian Cultural Politics$
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G.A. Bremner and Jonathan Conlin

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265871

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265871.001.0001

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The Consolations of Amero-Teutonism: E. A. Freeman’s Tour of the United States, 1881–2

The Consolations of Amero-Teutonism: E. A. Freeman’s Tour of the United States, 1881–2

Chapter:
(p.101) 6 The Consolations of Amero-Teutonism: E. A. Freeman’s Tour of the United States, 1881–2
Source:
Making History
Author(s):

Jonathan Conlin

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265871.003.0006

In 1881, E. A. Freeman sailed across the Atlantic, one of a number of British historians, scientists, and literary figures to tour the United States in the period between the Civil War and 1900. For Freeman the financial rewards of touring were balanced by onerous press scrutiny and unwelcome competition from rival celebrities, notably Oscar Wilde. Freeman’s lectures were intended to remind his American audiences of what he insisted was a shared Anglo-American history, one founded in racialist celebration of the birthright of free Teutons. Although resisted by Irish-Americans and those who insisted on American exceptionalism, Freeman’s views were shared by fellow Britons such as James Bryce and Charles Kingsley, as well as by founding fathers of the history as an academic discipline in the United States. This view reassured Britons concerned at the rise of the United States and shaped the understanding of the ‘special relationship’ in both countries.

Keywords:   special relationship, Anglo-American relations, speaking tours, Oscar Wilde

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