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Challenging the ModernConservative Revolution in German Music, 1918-1933$
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Nicholas Attfield

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266137

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266137.001.0001

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‘Eine neue, edle deutsche Jugendkultur’: August Halm, Gustav Wyneken, and the question of leadership

‘Eine neue, edle deutsche Jugendkultur’: August Halm, Gustav Wyneken, and the question of leadership

Chapter:
(p.140) 5 ‘Eine neue, edle deutsche Jugendkultur’: August Halm, Gustav Wyneken, and the question of leadership
Source:
Challenging the Modern
Author(s):

Nicholas Attfield

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266137.003.0006

August Halm’s 1913 notion of Bruckner as a synthesis between two musical ‘cultures’— represented by Bach and Beethoven—stands at the heart of this chapter. It argues that this idea was part of a larger project: the reorientation of the ruinous contemporary musical culture that Halm had often lamented. This project stemmed from a close collaboration with one of the most forceful evangelists of German school reform and the Jugendbewegung (‘youth movement’), Gustav Wyneken, and posited the guiding hand of an authoritarian ‘objective spirit’. As in the example of the school curriculum at Wickersdorf, this spirit would in turn be articulated by a carefully administered canon of German musical masters. Thus, the chapter argues that the nation’s youth, attuned by Halm to the dynamic process and autonomous logic of these masterworks, would serve in the transformation of music—as a symbol for wider culture—from a ‘luxury art’ to a true ‘people’s art’.

Keywords:   August Halm, Gustav Wyneken, youth movement, Jugendbewegung, Wickersdorf, music pedagogy, music education, objective spirit

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