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Defining the Discographic SelfDesert Island Discs in Context$
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Julie Brown, Nicholas Cook, and Stephen Cottrell

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266175

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266175.001.0001

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Personal Spin C

Personal Spin C

Documentary film-maker

Chapter:
(p.87) Personal Spin C
Source:
Defining the Discographic Self
Author(s):

Anthony Wall

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266175.003.0007

Roy Plomley was the calmest man I’ve ever met. Nothing rattled him. ‘Have a drink, dear boy’, he’d say, ‘I think the sun’s over the yardarm.’ He represented a certain kind of England that seems virtually to have disappeared, an England of manners and understatement where the game’s the thing and it might be more gracious to lose than to win—and possibly more interesting. He was no conformist, however. He never signed a contract with the BBC for more than two months at a time. Very quietly, he was something of a subversive. I think those famous questions he came up with, about loneliness, survival, the music, the chosen book and luxury, are impossible to answer without giving yourself away. Roy’s island provides acres of lush sandy space to present yourself as you wish the world to see you, an unlimited supply of creeper to swing adroitly from palm to palm or maybe just to hang yourself....

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