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Drums, Banners and Baraka: Symbols of Authority during the First Century of Marīnid Rule, 1250–1350*

Drums, Banners and Baraka: Symbols of Authority during the First Century of Marīnid Rule, 1250–1350*

Chapter:
(p.194) (p.195) 10 Drums, Banners and Baraka: Symbols of Authority during the First Century of Marīnid Rule, 1250–1350*
Source:
The Articulation of Power in Medieval Iberia and the Maghrib
Author(s):
Amira K. Bennison
Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265697.003.0010

This chapter explores how the Marīnid sultans expressed their authority to their subjects, especially those living beyond Fes, their capital city, during their first century of rule. The construction of palatine cities and madrasas were important marks of Marīnid authority in urban space but, as a dynasty ruling over a large rural tribal population, the Marīnids also needed to express their power and authority beyond the city. The chapter begins with analysis of the textual image of kingship presented in Marīnid chronicles and then considers how that image was disseminated to the population. It looks at Marīnid military progresses (ḥarakāt) between their fortresses and towns and Marīnid military engagements in the rural environment and shows how they used a number of symbols of monarchy, from the historically resonant Qurʾān of ʿUthmān to generic items such as drums and banners to make their power manifest.

Keywords:   Morocco, Marīnids, rural legitimation, banners, drums, symbols of rule, ḥaraka, army, jihād, Qurʾān of ʿUthmān

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