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The British Constitution in the Twentieth Century$
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Vernon Bogdanor

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780197263198

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197263198.001.0001

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The House of Lords

The House of Lords

Chapter:
(p.189) 6. The House of Lords
Source:
The British Constitution in the Twentieth Century
Author(s):

Rhodri Walters

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197263198.003.0006

This chapter examines the history of the House of the Lords in Great Britain during the twentieth century. The findings indicate that, in the twentieth century, the House of Lords could no longer vie with the House of Commons to be the forum of the nation, and that it was quite clearly a very different place at the end of the century from the House of the early 1900s. However, it became engaged in different tasks and performed a different role. In addition, the House became largely nominated and plutocratic, as a result of the Life Peerages and House of Lords Acts.

Keywords:   House of Lords, Great Britain, plutocratic, Life Peerages Act

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