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Anglo-Scottish Relations, from 1900 to Devolution and Beyond$
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William L Miller

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780197263310

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197263310.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

W(h)ither the Union? Anglo-Scottish Relations in the Twenty-first Century

W(h)ither the Union? Anglo-Scottish Relations in the Twenty-first Century

Chapter:
(p.202) (p.203) 13 W(h)ither the Union? Anglo-Scottish Relations in the Twenty-first Century
Source:
Anglo-Scottish Relations, from 1900 to Devolution and Beyond
Author(s):

David McCrone

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197263310.003.0013

This chapter argues that Britain in 1900 was neither a state nor a nation. It also claims that ‘the scale of grievances in Scotland…is simply not sufficient’ to endanger the union and ‘if anything’ devolution has decreased them. The union may mean what one want it to mean, as Humpty Dumpty observed. The irony is that the imperial connection has in large part reinforced the contradictions of British national identity. The chapter then examines the issues of identity. It also highlights the need not to assume that issues of citizenship and nationality operate according to the same framework in different parts of the kingdom. There does not appear to be an antipathy to being British among people in Scotland, but it does not ring with pride either: hence, perhaps, the usefulness of the ‘withering away’ metaphor. In addition, there is nothing inevitable either about the survival of the union, nor about its demise.

Keywords:   Anglo-Scottish relations, Britain, Scotland, union, British national identity, citizenship, nationality

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