Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
British Sociology Seen from Without and Within$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

A H Halsey and W G Runciman

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780197263426

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197263426.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 26 February 2020

Sociology and History: Partnership, Rivalry, or Mutual Incomprehension?

Sociology and History: Partnership, Rivalry, or Mutual Incomprehension?

Chapter:
(p.56) (p.57) 5. Sociology and History: Partnership, Rivalry, or Mutual Incomprehension?
Source:
British Sociology Seen from Without and Within
Author(s):
Roderick Floud, Pat Thane
Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197263426.003.0005

The 1960s was a period of ferment, intellectual excitement, optimism and expansion in all the social sciences, including sociology. It is, therefore, an appropriate starting point for a discussion of the relationship between history and sociology in Britain. The ferment affected different branches of history in different ways: political and diplomatic history hardly at all; social and economic history much more. The impact of the social sciences on economic history came primarily from neo-classical economic theory allied to econometrics. Historians looked to the social sciences in the 1960s and 1970s for concepts, theories, and methods which would assist them to reinvigorate the writing of history. There can be little doubt that economic history was much more influenced between 1960 and 1990 by economics than was social history by sociology. However, history since the 1960s has drawn more on the insights and methods of the social sciences than the social sciences in Britain, including sociology, have drawn on history; this is to the detriment of scholarship in the social sciences.

Keywords:   Britain, sociology, social history, social sciences, economic history, methods

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.