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The Arguments of Time$
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Jeremy Butterfield

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780197263464

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197263464.001.0001

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On the Emergence of Time in Quantum Gravity

On the Emergence of Time in Quantum Gravity

Chapter:
(p.110) (p.111) 6. On the Emergence of Time in Quantum Gravity
Source:
The Arguments of Time
Author(s):

Jeremy Butterfield

Chris Isham

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197263464.003.0006

This chapter discusses the idea that the treatment of time in present-day physical theories, general relativity and quantum theory, might be an approximation to a very different treatment in the as yet unknown quantum theory of gravity. It considers the general idea that one theory could be emergent from another, emergence being a relation analogous to, but weaker than, intertheoretic reduction. It also gives a broad description of the search for a quantum theory of gravity and some of its interpretative problems. Thereafter, the discussion focuses on the emergence of time in two specific quantum gravity programmes: quantum geometrodynamics and the Euclidean programme. It also addresses the so-called ‘problem of time’. It is really a cluster of problems; technical and conceptual, arising from how time is treated very differently in general relativity and quantum theory.

Keywords:   quantum gravity, general relativity, Euclidean programme, quantum geometrodynamics, quantum theory, problem of time

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