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The Justice of VeniceAuthorities and Liberties in the Urban Economy, 1550-1700$
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James E Shaw

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780197263778

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197263778.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

The Justice of Venice

The Justice of Venice

Chapter:
(p.22) I The Justice of Venice
Source:
The Justice of Venice
Author(s):

James E. Shaw

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197263778.003.0002

The Giustizia, or ‘Justice’, of Venice was one of the oldest magistracies of the city. Founded in 1173, it played a central role in the administration of the urban economy throughout the medieval and early-modern periods. On the other hand, the three Provveditori sopra la Giustizia Vecchia were elected by the Senate from its own number for a term of 12 months The senators who served as Provveditori generally did so as a preliminary step in an ambitious political career that might take them to the highest positions of the state, such as the Council of Ten. The hierarchical relationship between the two magistracies was therefore underlined by a social division between the types of nobles who served in them. The discussion considers the Provveditori di Comun, the reform of 1565, the Cinque Savi sopra le Mariegole, and discretion and mitigation.

Keywords:   Giustiza, market justice, Provveditori, Council of Ten, Mariegole

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