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Czechoslovakia in a Nationalist and Fascist Europe, 1918–1948$
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Mark Cornwall and R J W Evans

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780197263914

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197263914.001.0001

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The Transfer of Czechoslovakia’s Germans and its Impact in the Border Region after the Second World War

The Transfer of Czechoslovakia’s Germans and its Impact in the Border Region after the Second World War

Chapter:
(p.216) (p.217) 13 The Transfer of Czechoslovakia’s Germans and its Impact in the Border Region after the Second World War
Source:
Czechoslovakia in a Nationalist and Fascist Europe, 1918–1948
Author(s):

Zdeněk Radvanovský

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197263914.003.0013

When World War II broke out, Britain's Foreign Office set up a number of brains trusts which, in co-operation with the east European exile governments, proceeded to formulate plans for reordering central and south-eastern Europe. The planning intensified after the Soviet Union and the United States entered the war. Already the basic consensus was that those states to be reconstituted after Nazi Germany's defeat should have no national minorities — certainly no German minorities — and that this solution could be achieved through a massive transfer of inhabitants. Most political parties in Slovakia demanded autonomy for their country and the formation of an independent Slovak government. In Czechoslovakia's border regions in the early post-war months, there was something of a vacuum when it came to settling the fate of the Germans. Alongside the expulsion of the Germans, far less attention was paid in the Allied states to a concomitant development: the resettlement of the border region with a Czech or Slovak population.

Keywords:   World War II, Britain, United States, Germans, minorities, expulsion, border regions, resettlement, Czechoslovakia, Nazi Germany

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