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Socialism, Sex, and the Culture of Aestheticism in Britain, 1880-1914$
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Ruth Livesey

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780197263983

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197263983.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Dollie Radford and the Ethical Aesthetics of Fin-de-Siecle Poetry

Dollie Radford and the Ethical Aesthetics of Fin-de-Siecle Poetry

Chapter:
(p.132) 5 Dollie Radford and the Ethical Aesthetics of Fin-de-Siecle Poetry
Source:
Socialism, Sex, and the Culture of Aestheticism in Britain, 1880-1914
Author(s):

Ruth Livesey

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197263983.003.0006

This chapter uses the case of the poet, Socialist League member, and Fabian, Dollie Radford, to examine the relationship between socialism and fin-de-siècle aestheticism. After outlining Radford's conversion to socialism, the discussion examines her attempts to publish her work in the socialist journal Today. Radford's work from the 1880s forms a marked contrast with that of her widely published fellow Fabian E. Nesbit and the contrast highlights the oft-remarked ‘feminine’ lyricism of Radford's poetry. The chapter argues that, like Schreiner's Dreams, Radford's ‘A Ballad of Victory’, published in the Yellow Book, uses allegory to render political questions in an aesthetic register. The chapter concludes by comparing Radford's work from the 1890s with that of her fellow in the League, William Morris.

Keywords:   A Ballad of Victory, socialism, Dollie Radford, Dreams, feminine lyricism, William Morris

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