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The Transition to Late Antiquity, on the Danube and Beyond$
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Andrew Poulter

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780197264027

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197264027.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 29 January 2020

Ephesus in the Late Roman and Early Byzantine Period: Changes in its Urban Character from the Third to the Seventh Century ad

Ephesus in the Late Roman and Early Byzantine Period: Changes in its Urban Character from the Third to the Seventh Century ad

Chapter:
(p.390) (p.391) 16 Ephesus in the Late Roman and Early Byzantine Period: Changes in its Urban Character from the Third to the Seventh Century AD
Source:
The Transition to Late Antiquity, on the Danube and Beyond
Author(s):

S. LADSTÄTTER

A. PÜLZ

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197264027.003.0016

The third century marked a profound change in the urban landscape of Ephesus and proved to exert a profound influence on the city's later development. There is conclusive evidence for catastrophic disasters when the city was afflicted by a series of earthquakes which led to a temporary downturn in its economic circumstances. These destructive earthquakes not only had long-term consequences for the city's appearance, but also affected the very foundations of urbanism. This chapter traces the history of Metropolis Asiae after the earthquakes of the third and fourth centuries. The archaeological evidence proves that rebuilding took place and within public areas, such as agorae or buildings along the roads and included fountains and baths. The work was not limited only to the reconstruction of buildings but efforts were made to restore the splendid appearance of the city, reflecting the restoration of its high urban status and commercial importance. This chapter also describes the city's numerous churches that graphically attest to the growing importance of Christianity as the state religion.

Keywords:   Ephesus, urbanism, earthquakes, agorae, buildings, roads, reconstruction, restoration, churches, Christianity

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