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The Reception of Continental Reformation in Britain$
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Polly Ha and Patrick Collinson

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780197264683

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197264683.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

‘A Generall Reformation of Common Learning’ and its Reception in the English-Speaking World, 1560–1642

‘A Generall Reformation of Common Learning’ and its Reception in the English-Speaking World, 1560–1642

Chapter:
(p.192) (p.193) 9 ‘A Generall Reformation of Common Learning’ and its Reception in the English-Speaking World, 1560–1642
Source:
The Reception of Continental Reformation in Britain
Author(s):

Howard Hotson

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197264683.003.0009

This chapter provides a synthesis of the ‘Reformation of Common Learning’, which progressively developed from Peter Ramus’s pedagogy in the mid-sixteenth century to the work of the Moravian Comenius in the mid-seventeenth. The essay stretches the traditional periodisation and disciplinary boundaries often applied to reformation studies. By implication, it calls into question the understanding of a seventeenth-century ‘post-reformation’ era, a point underscored by mid-seventeenth-century writers such as Milton who spoke of reform as a continuous process. The wider intellectual currents that were contemporaneous to sixteenth- and seventeenth-century theological developments become essential to understanding the reception of reformation.

Keywords:   Moravian Comenius, Peter Ramus, reformation studies, Milton, theological developments

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