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TudorismHistorical Imagination and the Appropriation of the Sixteenth Century$
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Tatiana C. String and Marcus Bull

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780197264942

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197264942.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 26 February 2020

Myth and Memory in Representations of Henry VIII, 1509–2009

Myth and Memory in Representations of Henry VIII, 1509–2009

Chapter:
(p.201) 10 Myth and Memory in Representations of Henry VIII, 1509–2009
Source:
Tudorism
Author(s):

TATIANA C. STRING

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197264942.003.0011

This chapter explores a portrait of King Henry VIII that has played a key role in sustaining and inflecting received notions of the Tudor age in the post-Tudor period. It argues that almost without exception the Tudorist visual representations of King Henry VIII from the mid-sixteenth to the twenty-first century derive their communicative force from, and were indeed only made possible because of, the existence of an extraordinarily compelling and efficacious point of origin. The portrait of Henry VIII that set this cascade of information, ideas, and associations about the king in motion was the full-length portrait from the Whitehall Mural, painted by Hans Holbein the Younger (1497–1543) in 1537.

Keywords:   portraits, King Henry VIII, Tudor age, Hans Holbein, Whitehall Mural

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