Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jon Parkin and Timothy Stanton

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265406

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265406.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac

Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac

Chapter:
(p.165) 7 Toleration as Impartiality? Civil and Ecclesiastical Toleration in Jean Barbeyrac
Source:
Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment
Author(s):

Petter Korkman

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265406.003.0007

Jean Barbeyrac is a seminal figure in the history of natural law doctrine and one who, as a Huguenot refugee, had much to say on the topic of toleration. For Barbeyrac, natural law offered a secular rationalist principle of morality that could be used in the battle against Catholic persecution. Barbeyrac took from his seventeenth-century predecessors the natural law idea that the state was an essentially secular body and used that idea to license a much more thoroughgoing form of toleration. If the state had no religious competence then even atheism could be permitted, because it did not constitute an injury to the civil peace. This chapter shows that Barbeyrac's radical account of natural law and toleration made substantial modifications to the arguments of his predecessors, and in doing so moved natural law beyond the theological constraints that structured the defining work in the genre.

Keywords:   Jean Barbeyrac, natural law, toleration, persecution, atheism, John Locke, Samuel Pufendorf

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.