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Personal Names in Ancient Anatolia$
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Robert Parker

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265635

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265635.001.0001

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From Aphrodisias to Alexandria with Agroitas and Agreophon(via Hippoukome, Kalynda and Kaunos)

From Aphrodisias to Alexandria with Agroitas and Agreophon(via Hippoukome, Kalynda and Kaunos)

Chapter:
(p.145) 8 From Aphrodisias to Alexandria with Agroitas and Agreophon(via Hippoukome, Kalynda and Kaunos)
Source:
Personal Names in Ancient Anatolia
Author(s):

van Bremen Riet

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265635.003.0008

The focus of this chapter is on names that are not epichoric in a linguistic sense (for they are Greek), but have been emphatically said to be ‘of a region’. The cultural implications and justifications of such a statement are investigated for two names: Agroitas and Agreophon, said to be characteristic of the ‘Caro-Lycian border region’ (Kaunos, Kalyndos and the Indos river). Multiple instances of both occur in a long list of names from Hippoukome, high up in the Indos valley. The underlying assumption is that both have associations with hunting and wild nature and have roots in the Anatolian ‘tuf religieux’: the timeless religious substructures of the Lycian–Pisidian interior. The article questions this picturesque and superficially persuasive association on linguistic, cultural and statistical grounds.

Keywords:   Caro-Lycian border region, epichoric names, Kaunos, Hippoukome, Anatolian religion, Agroitas, Agreophon

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