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Personal Names in Ancient Anatolia$
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Robert Parker

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265635

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265635.001.0001

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Imperial Asia Minor:Economic Prosperity and Names

Imperial Asia Minor:Economic Prosperity and Names

Chapter:
(p.175) 9 Imperial Asia Minor:Economic Prosperity and Names
Source:
Personal Names in Ancient Anatolia
Author(s):

Marek Christian

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265635.003.0009

This paper deals with names in Anatolia which allude to various material goods of exceptional quality and/or rarity such as precious stones, aromatics, incense, etc., a large group of ‘exotics’ amongst them being imported from India, South Arabia and East Africa. The names’ occurrence shows a striking concentration in the imperial period; one might say that many were not deeply rooted in Greek onomastic tradition but attest to a recent fashion promoted and enhanced by the flourishing in particular of the Red Sea trade. The main attraction of such names may have consisted in their vague allusion to luxury, as is also regularly depicted on tombstones even in villages by symbols such as jewellery boxes, unguent jars, oil and perfume bottles, cases and chests.

Keywords:   Anatolia, India, Red Sea trade, precious stones, aromatics, luxury goods

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