Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Understanding Human Dignity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher McCrudden

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265642

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265642.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Dignity as Perception: Recognition of the Human Individual and the Individual Animal in Legal Thought

Dignity as Perception: Recognition of the Human Individual and the Individual Animal in Legal Thought

Chapter:
(p.573) 34 Dignity as Perception: Recognition of the Human Individual and the Individual Animal in Legal Thought
Source:
Understanding Human Dignity
Author(s):

Joseph Vining

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265642.003.0034

The individual recognized in law and life is more than the product exclusively of two factors, ‘the genetic’ and ‘the environmental’. There is a third element sensed, consciously or instinctively. When recognized the individual begins to block calculation as a form of thought—looking for justification in relative numbers, thinking in terms of systems. If perception of the individual does not block calculation entirely, it acts as a pressure in the mind towards a different kind of thinking, facing the tragic in choices and moving into the world of remorse, forgiveness, and beginning again. This same shift in thought can be seen repeatedly in modern developments in the legal treatment of animals. Whether or not the term ‘dignity’ is used in law with regard to animals, an understanding of human dignity can be clarified or confirmed by turning to its analogue where sentient creatures beyond the human are concerned.

Keywords:   animal, dignity, individual, law, person, science, sentience, spirit, torture

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.