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British Academy Lectures 2012-13Published in the online Journal of the British Academy$
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Janet Carsten and Simon Frith

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265666

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265666.001.0001

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Imitations of Christ in 17th-century France: Some attendant difficulties

Imitations of Christ in 17th-century France: Some attendant difficulties

Lecture in Modern Languages read 22 May 2013 by

Chapter:
(p.213) Imitations of Christ in 17th-century France: Some attendant difficulties
Source:
British Academy Lectures 2012-13
Author(s):

Richard Parish

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265666.003.0009

The most important verse paraphrase of the Imitation of Christ in 17th-century France was written by the dramatist Pierre Corneille. In his paratexts he discusses the difficulties he has encountered in the project, which expands on the original by including engravings, many of which illustrate episodes from the lives of saints. One such is Theodora, who is the subject of his closely contemporary martyr tragedy, Théodore. But here too he encountered difficulties, in the context of bienséance, from objections expressed to the prostitution with which the eponym is threatened. In a different idiom, the Jesuit priest Jean-Joseph Surin, seeing his role as exorcist as another kind of imitation of Christ, records his ordeal in two autobiographical works, one of which moves progressively into stylistic incoherence. Finally, Bossuet engages in the polemic surrounding a further possible implication of the term, in the form of the Catholic doctrine of the Real Presence.

Keywords:   Pierre Corneille, Jean-Joseph Surin, Bossuet, Imitation of Christ, verse paraphrase, martyr tragedy, exorcism, autobiography, polemic, Real Presence

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