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Unequal AttainmentsEthnic educational inequalities in ten Western countries$
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Anthony Heath and Yaël Brinbaum

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265741

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265741.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 05 April 2020

Gender and Ethnic Inequalities across the Educational Career

Gender and Ethnic Inequalities across the Educational Career

Chapter:
(p.193) 8 Gender and Ethnic Inequalities across the Educational Career
Source:
Unequal Attainments
Author(s):

Fenella Fleischmann

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265741.003.0008

This chapter examines whether the second generation has assimilated to Western patterns of female advantage in education. In contrast to most industrialised societies, which have witnessed a change towards female advantage in education in recent decades, gender gaps in education in ethnic minorities’ origin countries vary greatly, with persistent female disadvantage in world regions where many of the minorities under study originate. Interactions between female gender and ethnic background are examined for the five educational outcomes analysed in the previous chapters, thus covering the entire educational career. The results show that gender gaps among the second generation are on the whole as large and in the same direction as among the majority population. Thus the female disadvantage found in the parental generation disappears in the children's generation and is replaced by the same pattern of female advantage that is found among majority groups in Western countries.

Keywords:   gender, educational inequality, immigrants, second generation, origin country effects, comparative analyses

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