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Endangered LanguagesBeliefs and Ideologies in Language Documentation and Revitalization$
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Peter K. Austin and Julia Sallabank

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265765

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265765.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 04 August 2021

Must We Save the Language? Children’s Discourse on Language and Community in Provençal and Scottish Language Revitalization Movements*

Must We Save the Language? Children’s Discourse on Language and Community in Provençal and Scottish Language Revitalization Movements*

Chapter:
(p.195) 10 Must We Save the Language? Children’s Discourse on Language and Community in Provençal and Scottish Language Revitalization Movements*
Source:
Endangered Languages
Author(s):

James Costa Wilson

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265765.003.0010

This chapter proposes a critical analysis of the types of discourse articulated by children involved in language revitalization programmes in two Western European contexts: Provence (south-eastern France) and southern Scotland. It focuses on how the minority language (Occitan and Scots) is described and what this means for how children categorize the language and speech communities within which they are being socialized. Of all the social actors involved in language revitalization programmes, and despite the central part they play, children are the only ones whose opinion on participation is never required. Children occupy a very ambiguous place in language revitalization movements. On the one hand, they are perceived as the embodiment of the future of the language, while, on the other hand, they are often accused of not speaking the language properly or of mixing minority and dominant languages. This seems to be a fairly widespread pattern in Europe, where ‘neo-speakers’ are generally viewed with mistrust.

Keywords:   language ideologies, Scots, Occitan, language revitalization, education, children’s voices, primary education, immersion schools

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