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Endangered LanguagesBeliefs and Ideologies in Language Documentation and Revitalization$
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Peter K. Austin and Julia Sallabank

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780197265765

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197265765.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 10 April 2020

Paradoxes of Engagement with Irish Language Community Management, Practice, and Ideology

Paradoxes of Engagement with Irish Language Community Management, Practice, and Ideology

Chapter:
(p.29) 2 Paradoxes of Engagement with Irish Language Community Management, Practice, and Ideology
Source:
Endangered Languages
Author(s):

Tadhg Ó hIfearnáin

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197265765.003.0002

Since gaining independence in 1922, the Irish Government’s pro-Irish language policy has gone through several stages of development, moving from openly coercive maintenance strategies in designated areas (Gaeltacht) and obligatory Irish-medium schooling throughout the country, to a contemporary stance where the state sees Irish speakers as customers who require services. Policy for the majority Anglophone population is now based on a heritage role for Irish. Despite the evolution of state and community policies, some early ideological stances have remained at the core of decision-making. In the first decade of the twenty-first century the state has further reassessed its positions. The power of ideologically driven state language policy has inevitably produced mismatches which may paradoxically have further endangered the future of Irish as a community language. This chapter focuses on the stance of the monolingual English-speaking minority and inactive Irish speakers in Gaeltacht regions.

Keywords:   Irish language, Gaeltacht, minority language, language ideology, language policy, language management, language conflict, minority–majority interaction

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