Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Growing up in Diverse SocietiesThe Integration of the Children of Immigrants in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Frank Kalter, Jan O. Jonsson, Frank van Tubergen, and Anthony Heath

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266373

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266373.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 18 August 2019

Keeping Up with the Joneses, Müllers, De Jongs and Svenssons: The Economic Situation of Minority and Majority Youth

Keeping Up with the Joneses, Müllers, De Jongs and Svenssons: The Economic Situation of Minority and Majority Youth

Chapter:
(p.85) 4 Keeping Up with the Joneses, Müllers, De Jongs and Svenssons: The Economic Situation of Minority and Majority Youth
Source:
Growing up in Diverse Societies
Author(s):

Carina Mood

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266373.003.0004

This chapter studies how economic conditions differ between youth of immigrant background and majority youth in England, Germany, Netherlands and Sweden, with economic resources defined both in terms of family resources and the resources that children command themselves. We find that while immigrant parents tend to have lower incomes and more often suffer from non-employment and economic deprivation, their economic disadvantage does not carry over strongly to their children’s economic and material conditions: Children of immigrants have a similar situation to majority youth in terms of cash margin and material possessions, and they even tend to receive more money from their parents. Youth with immigrant background do however lack an own room more often and are less likely to earn own money from work, and those belonging to the first generation are somewhat more at risk of missing out on activities with friends, due to a lack of money. In general, poorer parents (immigrant as well as majority) tend to give equal amounts of money to their children as other parents, which suggests that they seek to shield their children from the consequences of a worse economy.

Keywords:   economic deprivation, poverty, economic resources, integration, pocket money

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.