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Growing up in Diverse SocietiesThe Integration of the Children of Immigrants in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden$
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Frank Kalter, Jan O. Jonsson, Frank van Tubergen, and Anthony Heath

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266373

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266373.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 18 August 2019

Family Structure and Father Absence among Immigrant Children: The Role of Migration, Religion and Inequality

Family Structure and Father Absence among Immigrant Children: The Role of Migration, Religion and Inequality

Chapter:
(p.143) 6 Family Structure and Father Absence among Immigrant Children: The Role of Migration, Religion and Inequality
Source:
Growing up in Diverse Societies
Author(s):

Matthijs Kalmijn

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266373.003.0006

This chapter examines differences in the families of ethnic minority and majority youth in four European countries (England, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden). The focus is on the degree to which the father is absent, as indicated by family structure and the strength of the father–child tie. To explain differences, we use three perspectives: a migration perspective, an economic perspective and a cultural perspective. Considerable heterogeneity is observed: some groups have much higher levels of father absence than the majority (sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America), whereas others have somewhat lower levels of father absence (Middle East, North Africa, South Asia). Cultural explanations partly explain the lower prevalence of father absence in some groups while suppressing the higher prevalence of father absence in other groups. Economic disadvantage, in contrast, partly explains the higher prevalence of father absence in some groups while suppressing the lower prevalence of father absence in others.

Keywords:   family structure, divorce, migration, immigrants, race, ethnicity, fathers, transnationalism

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