Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Growing up in Diverse SocietiesThe Integration of the Children of Immigrants in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Frank Kalter, Jan O. Jonsson, Frank van Tubergen, and Anthony Heath

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266373

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266373.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 18 August 2019

Mental Well-Being in Boys and Girls of Immigrant Background: The Balance between Vulnerability and Resilience

Mental Well-Being in Boys and Girls of Immigrant Background: The Balance between Vulnerability and Resilience

Chapter:
(p.369) 14 Mental Well-Being in Boys and Girls of Immigrant Background: The Balance between Vulnerability and Resilience
Source:
Growing up in Diverse Societies
Author(s):

Jan O. Jonsson

Carina Mood

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266373.003.0014

The difference in mental well-being between children of immigrants and children of the native-born can be seen as a crucial indicator of integration. Theories about acculturation and social stress due to adverse socio-economic circumstances in immigrant families predict that the well-being of children in these families would be at risk. Our study of internalising and externalising problems in adolescents does not find any support for this: if anything, there is a weak but systematic tendency for children of immigrants to have somewhat higher well-being, regardless of gender and immigrant generation. The advantages that we find for children of immigrants are partly accounted for by a stronger family orientation in immigrant families (for internalising problems), while religiosity accounts for most of the advantage in externalising behaviour. But even though family cohesion is of importance, there are only small differences in cohesion between children to immigrants and non-immigrants; and although the religiosity differs enormously between immigrant and majority families, the association with well-being is quite weak.

Keywords:   mental well-being, integration, mental health, immigrant paradox, psychological well-being, gender intensification

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.