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The Myth of Pelagianism$
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Ali Bonner

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266397

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266397.001.0001

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Pelagius did not Invent Anything: All the Teachings in His Writings Had Already Been Widely Disseminated in Ascetic Paraenesis (Parts II and III)

Pelagius did not Invent Anything: All the Teachings in His Writings Had Already Been Widely Disseminated in Ascetic Paraenesis (Parts II and III)

Chapter:
(p.111) 3 Pelagius did not Invent Anything: All the Teachings in His Writings Had Already Been Widely Disseminated in Ascetic Paraenesis (Parts II and III)
Source:
The Myth of Pelagianism
Author(s):

Ali Bonner

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266397.003.0003

This chapter examines the writings of Jerome, showing that he was a lifelong advocate of free will, that he interpreted predestination as God’s foreknowledge of autonomous human actions, that he stated that grace was given in accord with merit, and that he consistently referred to perfection as the goal of ascetic endeavour and as achievable. It analyses Jerome’s uncomfortable attempt to change his interpretation of Scripture in around AD 414 in order to meet accusations of heresy, since he had taught for decades the ideas now suddenly being labelled heretical. The chapter explores Ambrosiaster’s Commentaryon the Pauline Epistles and shows that it asserted free will and interpreted predestination as God’s foreknowledge of autonomous human actions, in order to preserve God’s justice.

Keywords:   Jerome, Ambrosiaster, free will, predestination, asceticism

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