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Re-Excavating JerusalemArchival Archaeology$
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Kay Prag

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266427

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266427.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Crisis and Transition in Jerusalem under Rome, Byzantium, Islam and the Crusades

Crisis and Transition in Jerusalem under Rome, Byzantium, Islam and the Crusades

Chapter:
(p.63) IV Crisis and Transition in Jerusalem under Rome, Byzantium, Islam and the Crusades
Source:
Re-Excavating Jerusalem
Author(s):

Kay Prag

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266427.003.0004

Comparing historical and archaeological evidence based on findings from the Kenyon excavations provides some information on the impact of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ transitions on the contemporary populations. An overview of the archaeological evidence illustrates both the processes and results of crisis, transition and aftermath. Jerusalem provides a case study of four major and several lesser episodes affecting ethnicity, politics, economy and religion over less than 1,500 years, from the Roman destruction in AD 70 and the establishment of Aelia Capitolina. There were major demographic changes resulting from the ‘hard’ transitions, but for all there is clear archaeological evidence of material and cultural transmission and survivals, visible not just in elite structures such as the major shrines, but widespread through a city with an ancient role as a central place of burial.

Keywords:   Aelia Capitolina, burial, crisis, cultural transmission, shrines

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