Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Sensory Substitution and Augmentation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Fiona Macpherson

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266441

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266441.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 18 November 2019

Sensory Substitution Devices and Behavioural Transference: A Commentary on Recent Work from the Lab of Amir Amedi

Sensory Substitution Devices and Behavioural Transference: A Commentary on Recent Work from the Lab of Amir Amedi

Chapter:
(p.122) 7 Sensory Substitution Devices and Behavioural Transference: A Commentary on Recent Work from the Lab of Amir Amedi
Source:
Sensory Substitution and Augmentation
Author(s):

Derek Brown

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266441.003.0007

Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) are most familiar from their use with subjects who are deficient in a target modality (e.g. congenitally blind subjects), but there is no doubt that the use and potential value of SSDs extend to persons without such deficits. Recent work by Amedi and his team (in particular Levy-Tzedek et al. 2012) has begun to explore this. Their idea is that SSDs may facilitate behavioural transference (BT) across sense modalities. In this case, a motor skill learned through visual perception might be subsequently employed in response to auditory perception, using an SSD as a mediator. They infer from the existence of such BT that the learned skill is amodally represented. After a brief overview I identify ways to more fully test for BT within this experimental paradigm and argue that their conclusion about amodal representation is premature. Additionally, I argue that their preferred SSD (Eyemusic) is of limited value for the project. While my remarks are critical, my intention is to be constructive, particularly in light of the fact that Levy-Tzedek et al. (2012) is, I believe, the first output from Amedi’s lab concerning this line of research.

Keywords:   sensory substitution, behavioural transference, amodal representation, Eyemusic

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.