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Power and Place in Europe in the Early Middle Ages$
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Jayne Carroll, Andrew Reynolds, and Barbara Yorke

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266588

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266588.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 26 October 2021

Mints, Moneyers and the Geography of Power in Early Medieval England and its Neighbours

Mints, Moneyers and the Geography of Power in Early Medieval England and its Neighbours

Chapter:
(p.414) 19 Mints, Moneyers and the Geography of Power in Early Medieval England and its Neighbours
Source:
Power and Place in Europe in the Early Middle Ages
Author(s):

Rory Naismith

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266588.003.0019

Thanks to the inscriptions on early medieval coins, the locations where they were made—mints—are among the best-recorded selections of places in Europe. This chapter seeks to demonstrate that the establishment of mints at particular times and places depended above all on contemporary governmental and social conditions. The later Roman Empire had emphasised the centrality of a few large mints closely tied to the fiscal system, but its successor kingdoms in England, Francia, Italy and Spain followed different criteria. Production was often organised on a more personal than institutional basis through the mediation of moneyers, and commercial activity, administrative functions or military/political significance could all dictate the production of coin. It is essential to consider the interaction of these and other factors in shaping the role of a mint, as well as the diversity in function and scale that could apply within even one territory.

Keywords:   early medieval coins, mints, social conditions, later Roman Empire, commercial activity, moneyers, military/political significance

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