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The AnglosphereContinuity, Dissonance and Location$
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Ben Wellings and Andrew Mycock

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266618

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266618.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 08 August 2020

The Anglo-American Worldview and the Question of World Order

The Anglo-American Worldview and the Question of World Order

Chapter:
(p.175) 10 The Anglo-American Worldview and the Question of World Order
Source:
The Anglosphere
Author(s):

Andrew Gamble

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266618.003.0010

One of the distinctive features of the idea of an Anglosphere has been a particular view of world order, based on liberal principles of free movement of goods, capital and people, representative government, and the rule of law, which requires a powerful state or coalition of states to uphold and enforce them. This chapter charts the roots as well as the limits of this conception in the period of British ascendancy in the nineteenth century, and how significant elements of the political class in both Britain and the United States in the twentieth century came to see the desirability of cooperation between the English-speaking nations to preserve that order against challengers. This cooperation was most clearly realised in the Second World War. The post-war construction of a new liberal world order was achieved under the leadership of the United States, with Britain playing a largely supportive but secondary role. Cooperation between Britain and the US flourished during the Cold War, particularly in the military and intelligence fields, and this became the institutional core of the ‘special relationship’. The period since the end of the Cold War has seen new challenges emerge both externally and internally to the Anglo-American worldview.

Keywords:   Anglosphere, liberal world order, UK–US special relationship

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