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Total WarAn Emotional History$
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Lucy Noakes, Claire Langhamer, and Claudia Siebrecht

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266663

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266663.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 25 November 2020

Wounded Pride and Petty Jealousies: Private Lives and Public Diplomacy in Second World War Cairo

Wounded Pride and Petty Jealousies: Private Lives and Public Diplomacy in Second World War Cairo

Chapter:
(p.98) 6 Wounded Pride and Petty Jealousies: Private Lives and Public Diplomacy in Second World War Cairo
Source:
Total War
Author(s):

Martin Francis

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266663.003.0006

This chapter offers a case study of the affective registers of British imperial policy during the Second World War. It examines how the conduct of war and diplomacy by Sir Miles Lampson, British Ambassador in Cairo, was shaped by his emotional dispositions, in particular his domestic obligations and attachments, his insecure pride, and his susceptibility to jealousy and resentment. It locates Lampson’s personal negotiation between private feeling and public action in the broader context of the heightened emotional registers of wartime Egypt, where it became virtually impossible to quarantine intimate desires, especially romantic and sexual longings, within the private sphere. More critically, it also demonstrates how broader anxieties about Britain’s waning global hegemony during the Second World War were manifested in the various forms of psychological projection, displacement, and compulsion exhibited by Lampson, and also in the Ambassador’s recourse in his statecraft to gossip and rumour.

Keywords:   emotion, Second World War, empire, diplomacy, Egypt, psychological projection

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