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Migrants in Medieval England, c. 500-c. 1500$
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W. Mark Ormrod, Joanna Story, and Elizabeth M. Tyler

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266724

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266724.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 12 April 2021

The Archaeology of Migrants in Viking-Age and Anglo-Norman England: Process, Practice, and Performance

The Archaeology of Migrants in Viking-Age and Anglo-Norman England: Process, Practice, and Performance

Chapter:
(p.175) 7 The Archaeology of Migrants in Viking-Age and Anglo-Norman England: Process, Practice, and Performance
Source:
Migrants in Medieval England, c. 500-c. 1500
Author(s):

Dawn M. Hadley

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266724.003.0007

This chapter discusses the manner in which early medieval archaeologists have attempted, with varying degrees of confidence, to trace migration. It argues that we need to do more than rely on scientific approaches, such as stable isotope analysis, not least because evidence for where a person spent their childhood addresses only one element of their experiences of migration. Through analysis of evidence of craftworking, settlements, diet and cuisine, and burials, the chapter demonstrates that there is ample archaeological evidence for early medieval migration on a variety of scales. It is argued that movement of people is best traced not by study of style and constructed identity, but through socially embedded traits, such as craftworking, animal husbandry, and culinary practices, which reflect a range of social identities, not simply, if at all, the ethnic identities with which debates about migration have routinely, and unsatisfactorily, become entangled.

Keywords:   Material culture, Craftworking, Settlement, Burial, Diet and cuisine, Norman Conquest, Scandinavians

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