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Insane AcquaintancesVisual Modernism and Public Taste in Britain, 1910-1951$
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Daniel Moore

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266755

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266755.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 11 April 2021

‘A revolution of incalculable effect’: modernism and the teaching of art in schools

‘A revolution of incalculable effect’: modernism and the teaching of art in schools

Chapter:
(p.60) 3 ‘A revolution of incalculable effect’: modernism and the teaching of art in schools
Source:
Insane Acquaintances
Author(s):

Daniel Moore

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266755.003.0003

This chapter explores a range of encounters between modernism and school-children. Focused most sharply on the work of Marion Richardson, teacher of art at Dudley High School for Girls, it ranges across arts education policy in Britain in the early twentieth century and some other initiatives designed to get abstract art into the classroom. Richardson, in particular, has hardly been attended to by modernist scholars, but her work at Dudley, and later at the London County Council, was crucial in transforming the teaching of visual art across Britain.

Keywords:   modernism, art, schools, Marion Richardson, abstract art

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