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Village Institutions in Egypt in the Roman to Early Arab Periods$
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Micaela Langellotti and D. W. Rathbone

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266779

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266779.001.0001

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The Association of State Farmers and Its Role in Village Administration in Roman Egypt

The Association of State Farmers and Its Role in Village Administration in Roman Egypt

Chapter:
(p.82) 5 The Association of State Farmers and Its Role in Village Administration in Roman Egypt
Source:
Village Institutions in Egypt in the Roman to Early Arab Periods
Author(s):

Thomas Kruse

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266779.003.0005

This paper examines the role of the state farmers, their organisation and changes as a village institution in Roman Egypt. Since the cultivation of public land in Roman Egypt constituted one of the major sources of the income for the province, it is not surprising that the state farmers, usually called demosioi georgoi (public farmers), were one of the most important groups of the rural population. As public land was usually cultivated through a hereditary lease, the rural population saw the plots which were attached to their villages as their own property. It was, therefore, a natural consequence that the state farmers became involved in the management of their village’s affairs and in doing so cooperated with the local administrative officials.

Keywords:   state farmers, Egyptian village administration, public farmers, Egyptian elders, Egyptian village organisation

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