Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Tracing the Relationship between Inequality, Crime and PunishmentSpace, Time and Politics$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nicola Lacey, David Soskice, Leonidas Cheliotis, and Sappho Xenakis

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266922

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266922.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

The Violence of Inequality: Race and Lobbying in the Politics of Crime and Criminal Justice in the United States

The Violence of Inequality: Race and Lobbying in the Politics of Crime and Criminal Justice in the United States

Chapter:
(p.68) 4 The Violence of Inequality: Race and Lobbying in the Politics of Crime and Criminal Justice in the United States
Source:
Tracing the Relationship between Inequality, Crime and Punishment
Author(s):

Sappho Xenakis

Leonidas K. Cheliotis

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266922.003.0004

There is no shortage of scholarly and other research on the reciprocal relationship that inequality bears to crime, victimisation and contact with the criminal justice system, both in the specific United States context and beyond. Often, however, inequality has been studied in conjunction with only one of the three phenomena at issue, despite the intersections that arguably obtain between them–and, indeed, between their respective connections with inequality itself. There are, moreover, forms of inequality that have received far less attention in pertinent research than their prevalence and broader significance would appear to merit. The purpose of this chapter is dual: first, to identify ways in which inequality’s linkages to crime, victimisation and criminal justice may relate to one another; and second, to highlight the need for a greater focus than has been placed heretofore on the role of institutionalised inequality of access to the political process, particularly as this works to bias criminal justice policy-making towards the preferences of financially motivated state lobbying groups at the expense of disadvantaged racial minorities. In so doing, the chapter singles out for analysis the US case and, more specifically, engages with key extant explanations of the staggering rise in the use of imprisonment in the country since the 1970s.

Keywords:   Race and Crime, Victimisation, Criminal Justice, Public Opinion, Segmented Representation, Lobbying, United States

British Academy Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.