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Making and Breaking Peace in Sudan and South SudanThe Comprehensive Peace Agreement and Beyond$
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Sarah M. H. Nouwen, Laura M. James, and Sharath Srinivasan

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780197266953

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197266953.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

Abyei, the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and the War in Sudan’s New South

Abyei, the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and the War in Sudan’s New South

Chapter:
(p.62) 4 Abyei, the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and the War in Sudan’s New South
Source:
Making and Breaking Peace in Sudan and South Sudan
Author(s):

Douglas H. Johnson

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197266953.003.0004

The Comprehensive Peace Agreement succeeded in resolving Sudan’s oldest political question regarding the future of South Sudan, but its most obvious failure was the immediate resumption of war inside Sudan’s ‘New South’ along its border with South Sudan before the latter’s formal independence in July 2011. By focusing on resolving ‘the Southern Problem’ only, the international mediators failed to recognize the common political, economic, and cultural issues of marginalisation that linked large parts of the border region to the wider war. Conflict in Abyei preceded the outbreak of the second civil war in 1983, but the Abyei Protocol was largely an afterthought that inadequately addressed the main issues confronting the peoples of the area. The CPA as a whole failed to include robust monitoring instruments to enforce compliance, enabling Khartoum to refuse to accept any resolution to the Abyei conflict on anything but its own terms.

Keywords:   Abyei, marginalisation, monitoring, compliance, conflict

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