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Economic Actors and the Limits of Transitional JusticeTruth and Justice for Business Complicity in Human Rights Violations$
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Leigh A. Payne, Laura Bernal-Bermúdez, and Gabriel Pereira

Print publication date: 2022

Print ISBN-13: 9780197267264

Published to British Academy Scholarship Online: May 2022

DOI: 10.5871/bacad/9780197267264.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM BRITISH ACADEMY SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.britishacademy.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright British Academy, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in BASO for personal use.date: 04 July 2022

Business as Usual? The Legacy of Transitions to Democracy on Corporate Accountability

Business as Usual? The Legacy of Transitions to Democracy on Corporate Accountability

Chapter:
(p.163) 8 Business as Usual? The Legacy of Transitions to Democracy on Corporate Accountability
Source:
Economic Actors and the Limits of Transitional Justice
Author(s):

Tricia D. Olsen

Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:10.5871/bacad/9780197267264.003.0009

While the first part of the volume explores how transitional justice mechanisms and pressure for corporate accountability from below can address past atrocities, this chapter introduces the second half of the volume that focuses on the post-transition era. This chapter explores how a country’s past—accountability efforts for former state actors for human rights abuses—shapes its future and the ability to hold corporations accountable. Using the Corporations and Human Rights Database (CHRD), this chapter uses large-N data from Latin America to explore the following questions: Do accountability efforts for state-sponsored human rights abuses in the past affect access to remedy for corporate human rights abuses in the post-transition era? Does accountability from below in one historical moment shape accountability in another? Or, is access to remedy limited, as it is a function of entrenched economic interests and veto players? 

Keywords:   Post-transition, Business and human rights, Corporations and Human Rights Database, Veto players, Quantitative analysis, Transitional justice 

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